Few states require HPV vaccine

The NPR “Shots” blog reports that “nine years after it was first approved in June 2006, the HPV vaccine has had a far more sluggish entree into medical practice than other vaccines at a similar point in their history, according to a report in … JAMA.” The blog adds that “according to the CDC’s most recent data,” only “37.6 percent of American teenage girls have received all three doses of the HPV vaccine, and just 13.9 percent of American teenage boys.”

Reuters reports that the JAMA research letter says that just two states and Washington DC require children to get the vaccine.

HealthDay reports, however, that “researchers say most U.S. states do require other vaccines routinely recommended for preteens and teenagers – the vaccines against hepatitis B, chickenpox and meningitis.”

As a result, HPV vaccination rates up only slightly, CDC says.

The CBS Evening News reported that “a report out today found that just 60 percent of teenaged girls and only 42 percent of boys have received” the HPV vaccine. CBS’ Dr. Jon Lapook said that “the CDC said the number one reason is that not enough pediatricians are recommending it.”

TIME reports that the data indicate “that despite public health efforts, the number of teen boys and girls receiving the … vaccine only increased slightly” last year.

In a statement, Dr. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general and director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said, “We are missing crucial opportunities to protect the next generation from cancers caused by HPV.”

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