Tag Archives: healthy eating

New school nutrition guidelines issued

First Lady Michelle Obama teamed up with Rachael Ray to unveil the biggest overhaul on school meals in more than 15 years. There will be more whole grains, less salt and a wider selection of fruits and vegetables and all milk must now be low fat. But the new rules do not go as far as the Administration had hoped. Continue reading

Kids’ snacks CAN be healthy and inexpensive

It’s well-documented that healthy foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables tend to cost more than “junk” foods such as chips and cookies, a phenomenon that’s often cited as a contributing factor to the U.S. obesity epidemic. But a new study conducted in YMCAs found that healthy snacks aren’t always more expensive, and in some cases are even more economical. Continue reading

Eating frequently may lead to less weight gain in girls

Reuters reports that according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, girls who ate meals and snacks frequently gained less weight than girls who ate only a few times every day. Continue reading

Protein or carbs? It may not matter!

The Wall Street Journal reported on a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggesting that a person’s total calorie intake, regardless of the nutritional source of the calories, determines how much fat accumulates in the body. Continue reading

CDC: Most Americans eat too much salt

Bloomberg News  reports, “Almost all US citizens, including children, exceed the dietary guidelines for salt, putting them at risk for hypertension and heart disease, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” Continue reading

Institute of Medicine panel proposes grading system for food

The Washington Post explains an Institute of Medicine report saying that “a symbol, such as a check mark or a star, should be displayed on the front of every food item and beverage sold in grocery stores so harried shoppers can judge nutritional value at a glance.”  Continue reading

Give Thanksgiving leftovers a healthy and delicious overhaul

One of the wonderful things about Thanksgiving dinner is there are often lots of delicious leftovers. You can just warm up a few of your favorite dishes or make a simple turkey sandwich. But for healthful alternatives, USA Today asked the Food Network’s Ellie Krieger, the editors of EatingWell and Cooking Light to share some nutritious recipes that use Thanksgiving leftovers. I hope you try them out. Continue reading

Give Thanksgiving leftovers a healthy and delicious overhaul

One of the wonderful things about Thanksgiving dinner is there are often lots of delicious leftovers. You can just warm up a few of your favorite dishes or make a simple turkey sandwich. But for healthful alternatives, USA Today asked the Food Network’s Ellie Krieger, the editors of EatingWell and Cooking Light to share some nutritious recipes that use Thanksgiving leftovers. I hope you try them out.

Greek salad pitas with feta spread and turkey

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp non-fat plain yogurt
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp finely grated lemon zest
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 whole-wheat pita breads
  • 4 large pieces of romaine lettuce, torn in half
  • 1 English cucumber, sliced into half moons
  • ¼ cup lightly packed fresh mint leaves
  • ¾ lb. thinly sliced roasted turkey breast

Directions:

In a medium bowl, combine the feta cheese and yogurt with a fork, mashing any large chunks of cheese. Stir in the lemon juice, oregano, lemon zest and pepper. The spread will keep for up to five days in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

To make a sandwich, cut a pita in half to form two pockets. Line each pocket with a half of a lettuce leaf. Spread two heaping tablespoons of feta spread into the pocket.

Then fill each pocket with about six cucumber slices, four or five mint leaves and two or three slices of turkey.

Servings: 4, two pockets

Nutrition information per serving: 360 calories; 9 grams of fat; 5 grams of saturated fat; 32 grams of protein; 40 grams of carbohydrate; 6 grams of fiber; 80 milligrams of cholesterol; 700 milligrams of sodium.

Source: So Easy: Luscious, Healthy Recipes for Every Meal of the Week by Ellie Krieger

Creamy carrot and sweet potato soup

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp butter, divided
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg
  • 4¾ cups cubed peeled sweet potatoes (1½ pounds)
  • 3½ cups water
  • 3 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 cups chopped carrots (about 1 pound)
  • ¼ cup half-and-half
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • ⅓ cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onion to pan; cook 4 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in cinnamon and nutmeg. Cook 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Move onion mixture to side of pan; add remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to open space in pan. Increase heat to medium-high; cook 1 minute or until butter begins to brown. Add sweet potatoes, water, broth and carrots; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 35 minutes or until vegetables are tender.

Place half of soup mixture in a blender. Remove center piece of blender lid (to allow steam to escape); secure blender lid on blender. Place a clean towel over opening in blender lid (to avoid splatters). Blend until smooth.

Pour into a large bowl. Repeat procedure with remaining soup mixture. Stir in half-and-half, salt, and pepper. Ladle about 1 cup soup into each of 8 bowls; top each serving with about 2 teaspoons sour cream and ¾ teaspoon parsley.

Servings: 8, about one cup each

Nutrition information per serving: 173 calories; 6.7 grams of fat; 4.1 grams of saturated fat; 3.6 grams of protein; 25.7 grams of carbohydrate; 5 grams of fiber; 18 milligrams of cholesterol; 415 milligrams of sodium.

Source: Cooking Light, November 2009 (MyRecipes.com)

Cream of turkey and wild rice soup

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups sliced mushrooms (about 4 oz.)
  • ¾ cup chopped celery
  • ¾ cup chopped carrots
  • ¼ cup chopped shallots
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup quick-cooking or instant wild rice
  • 3 cups shredded cooked turkey or chicken (12 oz.)
  • ½ cup reduced-fat sour cream
  • 2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

Directions

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add mushrooms, celery, carrots and shallots and cook, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add flour, salt and pepper and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes more.

Add broth and bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Add rice and reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook until the rice is tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in turkey (or chicken), sour cream and parsley and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes more.

Ingredient note: Quick-cooking or instant wild rice has been parboiled to reduce the cooking time. Conventional wild rice takes 40 to 50 minutes to cook. If you can’t find the quick-cooking variety, just add cooked conventional wild rice along with the turkey at the end of Step 2.

Servings: 4, about 1¾ cups each

Nutrition information per serving: 354 calories; 9 grams of fat; 3 grams of saturated fat; 36 grams of protein; 27 grams of carbohydrate; 3 grams of fiber; 87 milligrams of cholesterol; 378 milligrams of sodium.

Source: EatingWell magazine; eatingwell.com

Go healthy, not hungry for Thanksgiving dining

The holiday season means you’ll be faced with a seemingly endless buffet of food temptation. While some people simply give in and eat too much, others deny themselves any holiday treats.

But there are ways to navigate between overindulgence and deprivation, according to Julie Redfern, manager of Nutrition Consult Services at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She offers the following advice in a report by Health on the Net Foundation:

  • Eat a light snack before you go to a holiday party. That will prevent you from arriving hungry and overeating or gobbling down foods high in calories and saturated fat.
  • When you’re invited to a party, offer to bring a healthy food dish.
  • Research how you can use healthy ingredients in your favorite holiday recipes. For example, using 1 percent milk instead of whole milk and cream in a traditional eggnog recipe can save almost 200 calories and 20 grams of fat per serving.
  • Wear tight clothes, such as form-fitting slacks, to holiday events. People who wear loose clothing tend to overeat without realizing it.
  • Staying away from the food table at gatherings will help you resist the urge to eat.
  • Carrying a clutch or handbag will keep your hands busy and reduce the likelihood that you’ll reach for every treat that passes your way.
  • Use a small plate or no plate. You’ll eat less if you have to walk back and forth to get food.
  • Keep portion control in mind. A dinner plate should be half vegetables, a quarter protein, and a quarter carbs. Avoid going back for seconds and thirds.
  • You can have dessert, but keep the portions small.
  • Beware of high-calorie holiday drinks such as eggnog and apple cider. Have only a small cup.
  • Plan to go for a family walk after your main holiday meal.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

8 Tips for Eating Healthy During Menopause

Good news! Aging does not have to equal weight gain. Women do tend to put on a pound a year in their 40s and 50s, but it’s more likely due to a drop in activity rather than hormones. However, hormonal changes can shift your body composition, so any pounds you do gain tend to land in your middle. Here are some tips from Rachel Meltzer Warren, MS, RD, that were first published on Health.com:

Here are some ways to stay slim, reduce menopausal symptoms, and cut the health risks that can rise after menopause.

1) Go fish

Heart disease risk is likely to rise after menopause, so you should try to eat at least two servings of fish per week (preferably those with healthy fats like salmon or trout).

“Women may want to give [fish oil] supplements a try if having two servings of fish a week is problematic,” says JoAnn Manson, MD, chief of preventive medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston.

Preliminary research suggests that fish oil may also help prevent breast cancer.

Aim for two servings of fish a week—and talk to your doctor about whether or not you should try a supplement.

2) Slim down

If you’re overweight you can minimize menopausal symptoms and reduce the long-term risks of declining hormones by losing weight, says Mary Jane Minkin, MD, clinical professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive sciences at Yale University School of Medicine, in New Haven, Conn.

Slimming down not only reduces the risks of heart disease and breast cancer, both of which go up after menopause, says Dr. Minkin, but new research shows that it may also help obese or overweight women cut down on hot flashes.

3) Bone up on calcium

Your calcium needs go up after age 50, from 1,000 milligrams per day to 1,200 mg. “With less estrogen on board, your bones don’t absorb calcium as well,” says Dr. Minkin.

If you have a cup of low-fat milk, one latte, and one 8-ounce yogurt, you’re getting around 1,100 mg calcium. This means you need to take only an additional 100 mg of supplements a day—less than one caplet’s worth—to make up the difference.

If you’re eating dairy, choose low-fat products. These have roughly the same amount of calcium as their full-fat counterparts, but with fewer calories.

4) Ease bloating

“About 100% of my patients going through menopause complain of bloating,” says Dr. Minkin. Although the reasons aren’t clear, fluctuating hormones during perimenopause may play a role.

Dr. Minkin recommends cutting the amount of salt and processed carbohydrates in your diet, as they can make you retain water. But don’t skimp on whole grains, which are rich in heart-healthy fiber, as well as fruits and vegetables.

If healthy food, such as apples and broccoli, make you feel bloated, Dr. Minkin suggests taking Mylanta or Gas-X to combat gas buildup.

5) Rethink that drink

Red wine gets a lot of press for its impact on heart health, but for menopausal women the drawbacks of alcohol might outweigh the benefits.

“One drink a day has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer,” says Dr. Manson. “So while it has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, it really is a trade-off for women.”

If you enjoy a glass of Pinot, try watering it down with seltzer to make a spritzer (you’ll cut calories too). Also keep in mind that red wine and other drinks may bring on hot flashes as a result of the increase in blood-vessel dilation caused by alcohol.

6) Say yes to soy

Soy contains plant estrogens, so many women think it can increase their breast cancer risk, says Dr. Minkin. However, there is little data to support this. The misconception likely comes from studies of high-dose soy supplements, which may stimulate the growth of estrogen-sensitive tumors.

Soy foods like tofu, soy nuts, and soy milk may offer relief from mild hot flashes and are not thought to increase breast cancer risk. “Women in Japan have the highest soy intake and the lowest risk of breast cancer, but Japanese women who move to the U.S. and eat less soy have a higher risk,” adds Dr. Minkin.

7) Try iced herbal tea

A warm cup of joe might be as much a part of your a.m. routine as brushing your teeth. Still, starting your day with a piping-hot drink may not be the best idea during menopause.

“In general, warm beverages seem to trigger hot flashes,” says Dr. Manson. “And the caffeine in coffee and tea could also be having an effect.”

Cover your bases by swapping your morning cup with something cool and decaffeinated—like a Tazo Shaken Iced Passion Tea at Starbucks or a decaf iced coffee.

8) Find a diet that fits

If you need to shed pounds, weight loss is no different during menopause than before it. “If you take in less calories than you burn for a long period of time, you’re going to lose weight,” says Dr. Minkin.

Any balanced diet that cuts calories—and that you can stick with in the long run—will do the job.

However, one study found that postmenopausal women who were on a diet that was low in fat and high in carbohydrates from vegetables, fruits, and grain were less likely to gain weight than women who ate more fat. Consider the new CarbLovers Diet which is rich in whole grains and other figure-friendly foods.

Keep Health in Mind When Planning School Day Menus For Your Kids

As a parent preparing for your child’s school day, it may be helpful to remember that healthy meals and snacks are essential for learning. Here are some helpful tips from the experts at HealthDay News:

“Parents can make the school day easier for their children by providing nutritious and yummy breakfasts, lunches and snacks that promote optimal learning. Everyone is in a rush in the morning, but it only takes a few minutes on Sunday to plan healthy meals to fuel your child’s week,” Karin Richards, director of the Exercise Science and Wellness Management program, and director of Health Sciences at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, said in a university news release.

Richards offered the following advice for parents as they plan breakfast, lunch and snacks for their school-age children:

  • Include at least three types of foods into each meal, making sure to include some type of protein and complex carbohydrates, such as whole wheat bagels or pasta. The complex carbohydrates will provide energy while the protein will satisfy your child’s appetite for a longer period of time.
  • Bring your child to the market with you and let him or her choose one fruit or vegetable each week. Encourage kids to try new and interesting produce such as kiwi, papaya and edamame.
  • Monitor portion size. Three to four ounces of meat (about the size of your palm) is plenty. Adjust the amount based on your child’s age and activity level.
  • Add more vegetables into your child’s diet, even if you have to sneak them in. For example, try zucchini bread, veggies with low-fat dip, or shred carrots into tomato sauce and soups.
  • For beverages, suggest no-fat milk or water. If you child prefers juice, make sure it’s 100 percent juice.

Many types of standard lunch fare are packed with calories and fat. But there are healthier alternatives that can make for a more nutritious lunch. The Nemours Foundation suggests these healthier lunch options:

  • Turkey and other low-fat deli meats.
  • Whole grain bread — instead of white — spread with mustard or light mayo.
  • Vegetables and dip, air-popped popcorn, and trail mix or baked potato chips, in place of fried potato chips.
  • Fresh fruit or packaged fruit in natural juices, instead of syrup.
  • Yogurt or a homemade fruit-filled muffin, in place of packaged cakes or cookies.
  • No-fat milk or water, in place of sodas or sugary fruit drinks.

For More information From The Nemours Foundation About Children And Healthy Eating click here.

Program Teaches Parents How to Nurture Healthy Eaters

Early feeding practices can play critical role in kids’ eating patterns, a press release from the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior suggests. Here are some details from a report in HealthDay News: Teaching first-time mothers to feed their infants “responsively” results in the babies being more likely to become healthy eaters, which reduces their risk of obesity.

For the study, nurses visited first-time moms at home and taught them about timing and methods for introducing solid foods to infants, how to use repeated exposure to improve their infant’s liking and acceptance of new foods such as vegetables, and how to recognize signs of infant hunger and fullness.

Infants of mothers who participated in the year-long program were more likely to accept vegetables and new types of foods.

“These results provide the first evidence that teaching parents how, what, and when to feed their infants can promote healthful eating habits,” lead researcher Jennifer Savage, of the Center for Childhood Obesity Research at Pennsylvania State University, said in a news release from the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior.

The new-mother education program also led to improved growth patterns among the infants, Savage noted.

“Because early feeding decisions and practices play a critical role in the development of children’s food preferences and intake, our intervention program focuses on teaching parents about how to respond sensitively and appropriately to infant hunger and fullness cues, allowing infants and toddlers a role in deciding how much to eat, while also providing information on how, what, and when to introduce solids to promote acceptance of new foods,” Savage said.

For more information on helping your child (and family) make wise nutrition choices, consider picking up a copy of my book SuperSized Kids: How to protect your child from the obesity threat. Both the hard- and soft-cover editions are on sale here.

Go Healthy, Not Hungry for Thanksgiving Eating

The holiday season means you’ll be faced with a seemingly endless buffet of food temptation. While some people simply give in and eat too much, others deny themselves any holiday treats.

But there are ways to navigate between overindulgence and deprivation, according to Julie Redfern, manager of Nutrition Consult Services at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She offers the following advice (in a report by Health on the Net Foundation):

  • Eat a light snack before you go to a holiday party. That will prevent you from arriving hungry and overeating or gobbling down foods high in calories and saturated fat.
  • When you’re invited to a party, offer to bring a healthy food dish.
  • Research how you can use healthy ingredients in your favorite holiday recipes. For example, using 1 percent milk instead of whole milk and cream in a traditional eggnog recipe can save almost 200 calories and 20 grams of fat per serving.
  • Wear tight clothes, such as form-fitting slacks, to holiday events. People who wear loose clothing tend to overeat without realizing it.
  • Staying away from the food table at gatherings will help you resist the urge to eat.
  • Carrying a clutch or handbag will keep your hands busy and reduce the likelihood that you’ll reach for every treat that passes your way.
  • Use a small plate or no plate. You’ll eat less if you have to walk back and forth to get food.
  • Keep portion control in mind. A dinner plate should be half vegetables, a quarter protein, and a quarter carbs. Avoid going back for seconds and thirds.
  • You can have dessert, but keep the portions small.
  • Beware of high-calorie holiday drinks such as eggnog and apple cider. Have only a small cup.
  • Plan to go for a family walk after your main holiday meal.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

How You Can Eat Heart-Healthy Food While Eating Out – What to enjoy, what to avoid

Eating out doesn’t have to mean consuming foods that contribute to heart disease. Recently Men’s Health magazine Editor Peter Moore discussed healthy options in three different types of cuisines, Italian, Mexican, and Chinese, and talked about menu “warning” words that can hint at unhealthy choices, and menu “friends” that could point to the opposite on a CBS Program. I though you’d benefit from his advice.

More Information: Continue reading