Study: Blasts may artificially age troops’ brains

USA Today reports that VA scientists “have discovered signs of early aging in the brains of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans caught near roadside bomb explosions, even among those who felt nothing from the blast.” Years after returning home, veterans “are showing progressive damage to the brain’s wiring, according to a study published in Brain, A Journal of Neurology.”

The study’s results “expand on VA research published in November that reported a lack of communication between areas of the brain according to scans taken of troops who had been within 30 feet of an explosion.”

“The most important message of these two studies is that they show for the first time in a large cohort of (Iraq and Afghanistan) veterans that exposure to explosions in combat affects the brain whether or not the soldier showed symptoms of a concussion at the time of the explosion,” Milberg said.

© Copyright WLL, INC. 2015. This blog provides a wide variety of general health information only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from your regular physician. If you are concerned about your health, take what you learn from this blog and meet with your personal doctor to discuss your concerns.

One thought on “Study: Blasts may artificially age troops’ brains

  • I suspect that long term study will show similar etiology and long term outcome when IED injuries from affected troops and repetitive concussive injuries in contact sports athletes are compared. Current studies indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be helpful in such cases. <a href= "http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/neu.2011.1895&quot; title= "A Phase I Study of Low-Pressure Hyperbaric OxygenTherapy for Blast-Induced Post-Concussion Syndrome
    and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder"

Comments are closed.

Enter your email to subscribe to Dr. Walt's blogs.

You have successfully subscribed to the newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

Dr. Walt Larimore will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.