Resistance Training Ups Testosterone in Muscles of Older Men

MedScape News is reporting a study showing that resistance training can increase the production of sex steroids in the muscles of older men. If borne out by further research, the findings could have important implications for a wide range of conditions experienced by many aging individuals and linked to a decline in sex steroid hormones, say Koji Sato, PhD, and colleagues from Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan in their report in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

“Resistance-training–induced increased muscular sex steroid hormone may positively affect age-related concerns such as accidental falls, diabetes, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis and may improve the quality of life for older individuals,” they note.

More and more men are using testosterone supplements in the hope of improving their strength, energy, and sexual performance. But this use has become increasingly controversial, because many experts believe such supplementation is not necessary and there is also mounting evidence of concerning side effects associated with the use of testosterone, particularly in older individuals.

Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced it is investigating the potential that FDA-approved testosterone products increase the risk for serious adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The agency cited two studies, the most recent of which shows that men treated with testosterone were significantly more likely to have a myocardial infarction (MI) in the first 90 days after starting the medication.

The second study, of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients, published last year, also found that testosterone therapy in men was linked with an increased risk of death, MI, or ischemic stroke.