Pediatrician group opposes consumption of raw milk

The New York Times “Well” blog reports that in a policy statement released in the journal Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that youngsters, babies, and expectant mothers not “consume any raw milk or raw milk products from cows, goats or sheep.” The group “says that the evidence of the benefits of pasteurization to food safety is overwhelming, and that the benefits of any elements in raw milk that are inactivated by pasteurization have not been scientifically demonstrated.”

Reuters points out that even though the Food and Drug Administration does not allow raw milk to be shipped across state lines for human consumption, it still may be sold legally in many states. Pathogens such as E. coli and salmonella may be carried in raw milk.

Medscape notes that the FDA also “has no jurisdiction in the regulation of milk sanitation within individual states.”

In continuing coverage, the Boston Globe reports that according to a study recently released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, “four percent of Minnesotans sickened by microorganisms in the last 10 years had recently consumed raw milk.”

Making the assumption that “far more people get sick than just those with positive lab tests,” the study authors estimated that “roughly 17 percent of all raw-milk consumers in the state were sickened.”

One thought on “Pediatrician group opposes consumption of raw milk

  • Linda Chaumont

    I found this very interesting. I drank some unpasturized milk in 1965 as a teenager and was unexplainably weak shortly after. All kinds of tests were done. They really never determined what was wrong with me. I married a dairy farmer but never drank milk from the tank or gave it to my children.

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