Monthly Archives: September 2011

TV watching as dangerous as smoking and lack of exercise

Researchers in Australia say smoking “can shorten of life expectancy by more than four years after the age of 50. That represents 11 minutes of life lost for every cigarette and that’s the same as half an hour of TV watching.” Said another way, for every hour of TV watched “after age 25, lifespan falls by 22 minutes.” Ouch! Time to turn off the TV, snub out the cigarettes, and begin walking 15 minutes a day to increase the quality and quantity of your life! Continue reading

15 minutes’ daily exercise boosts life expectancy by three years

ABC World News reported, “If you need any more convincing that a little bit of exercise can make a huge difference in your life, here’s some powerful new proof: A study in the medical journal Lancet looked at 400,000 people and found just 15 minutes of exercise a day increases life expectancy three years.” Continue reading

No sodas in schools equals less soda in teens

Surveys conducted in 2004 and 2006 showed that student consumption of sugary drinks was significantly reduced after implementation of policies in the Boston public schools against sale of the drinks. Another national survey did not show a concomitant decline in consumption of these beverages among youths of the same ages. Continue reading

Discredited hCG diet making a comeback

The Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune reported that the “long-discredited” human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) “diet is making a comeback, and the renewed interest has spawned a cottage industry for products that haven’t been tested for quality, safety or efficacy, including drops and sprays.” Continue reading

FDA and ABC slam Dr. Oz; say apple juice is safe

The Boston Globe “Daily Dose” blog reports that in response to “Oprah fave Dr. Mehmet Oz” telling viewers that there “are dangerous amounts of arsenic lurking in … apple juice,” the “US Food and Drug Administration took the unusual step of issuing a statement” that “‘small amounts of arsenic can be found in certain food and beverage products, including fruit juices and juice concentrates,’ and that ‘there is no evidence of any public health risk from drinking these juices.'” The blog points out that “the FDA has been testing such products for years to make sure they don’t fall above the allowable levels.” Continue reading

Could frequent tanning bed use become addicting?

The New York Times (Subscription Publication) “Well” blog reports, “People who frequently use tanning beds experience changes in brain activity during their tanning sessions that mimic the patterns of drug addiction,” according to a study appearing in the journal Addiction Biology. Continue reading

Two OTC drugs give better pain relief than one for osteoarthritis

A study published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases shows that “combination treatment using ibuprofen plus acetaminophen provided better relief of chronic knee pain than acetaminophen alone.” Continue reading

Think you have sleep apnea? Here’s an inexpensive way to predict.

Sleep testing (polysomnography or PSG) to diagnosis obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is expensive and inconvenient, and may not be easily available to patients in rural or under-resourced settings. Is there another option? A new study is reporting a simple, practical approach for primary care diagnosis of OSA. It involves four questions and a simple, inexpensive test. Continue reading

Annual physicals recommended for ALL young people, even non-athletes

USA Today reports that although most student athletes are “required to get physical exams to compete on school sports teams,” the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend annual checkups for ALL youth “up to age 21.” Continue reading

Early blood test for baby’s gender accurate and extremely controversial

On its front page, the New York Times (Subscription Publication) reported that according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), “a simple blood test that can determine a baby’s sex as early as seven weeks into pregnancy is highly accurate if used correctly.” For some couples, this is good news. For unborn children, I predict it means more death. Continue reading

Soy tablets NOT effective treating menopausal symptoms

Taking soy supplements will NOT ease the symptoms of menopause or protect against bone loss in women, researchers have reported. In fact, among women in the first five years of menopause, taking soy supplements was associated with a higher risk of bone loss compared with placebo, but significantly more women taking soy supplements had hot flashes. Continue reading

Young children’s lunches kept at unsafe temperatures

Nearly all lunches packed from home get too warm to prevent foodborne illness despite use of ice packs, according to a study of preschoolers’ sack lunches. In fact, even with multiple ice packs, more than 90% of perishables in the lunches reached unsafe temperatures. Continue reading

More American children eating high fat, fast-food lunches

HealthDay reported that children’s “fast-food lunches, often offered as rewards, accounted for up to 51 percent of most children’s daily caloric needs and more than 50 percent of their recommended daily sodium intake (100 percent of recommended sodium levels for preschoolers) meals,” according to a study in the journal Childhood Obesity. Continue reading

Group lists child car safety seats containing most and least hazardous chemicals

The CNN “The Chart” blog reported, “More than HALF of 2011 model children’s car seats contain one or more potentially hazardous chemicals, but the seats fared far better than previous years. Continue reading

Parenting style affects child’s mental health

Matching your parenting style to your child’s personality can greatly reduce your child’s risk of depression and anxiety, researchers say in a new study. Continue reading

Even small amounts of aerobic exercise lowers coronary heart disease risk

More research is showing that even small amounts of aerobic exercise help lower coronary heart disease risk. The newest review was published in the journal Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, and should encourage even the most sedentary of us to being moving physically. Continue reading

Regular exercise boosts the brain, especially for kids

Regular workouts not only do your body good, they likely improve your mind as well, at least according to review of the data on the subject. Continue reading

Brain shrinkage associated with four factors. What can you do starting today to prevent this?

If you could do four things to dramatically reduce your risk of brain shrinkage (especially that caused by dementia, vascular dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, or stroke), would that be of interest to you? Continue reading

Report: Colon cleansing lacks evidence to support its use

In my best-selling book, Alternative Medicine: The Christian Handbook, in the chapter on “Colonics,” co-author Donal O’Mathuna, PhD, and I conclude: “There is no scientific basis for using or recommending colonics for general health.” A new report confirms our recommendations. Continue reading