Monthly Archives: April 2011

Alternative Medicine and Children – Part 1 – Introduction

In this, my newest series of blogs, I want to discuss the growing interest in alternative medicine among adults that has now carried over to children and into the offices of pediatricians and family physicians. Continue reading

Less stress and more sleep may help you lose weight

If you or someone you love is overweight or obese, here’s some good news on a couple of other ways (other than better nutrition and exercise) you could consider to lose weight. The Los Angeles Times “Booster Shots” reported, “Getting a healthy amount of sleep, avoiding stress, and complying with specific elements of a weight-loss plan (such as keeping a food diary) seem to boost the odds of” losing weight.” Continue reading

Herbal remedies of limited help for colic

Colic is the bane of many sleep-deprived parents of newborns — but even though some crying, colicky babies may respond to alternative medicine remedies their use has little or no support from clinical trials, according to a recent systematic review. However, there may be some promising herbal remedies for colic. Continue reading

Cancer risk from airport scanners extremely low, study finds

My previous blogs on airport scanners (see list below) have been particularly popular among readers for obvious reasons. Now, Bloomberg News is reporting, “Airport body scanners pose little radiation risk to travelers, emitting less than 1 percent of the dose a person would get from cosmic rays while flying at high altitudes,” according to a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Continue reading

Maqui berry is the latest trendy super food

Maqui berry (pronounced “mah-kee”) is one of the hottest new berries being marketed for “weight loss,” “detoxification,” and for “general health.” But, does it work? Or not? Continue reading

Parents: Do NOT use car safety seats outside the car

The AP is reporting that the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) “and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued separate but consistent” new recommendations about car safety seats and and children riding in cars. These new recommendations (see this and the next two blogs) will require families to make some adjustments. And, I think this particular recommendation will surprise many:  Continue reading

Parents: Children younger than age 13 should ride in back seat of your car

The AP reported that the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) “and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration issued separate but consistent” new recommendations about the use of car safety seats with children. These new recommendations will require many families to change their current habits. Continue reading

Popular baby media does not actually advance learning

In past blogs I’ve warned parents, “‘Baby Einstein’ or ‘Brainy Baby’ may turn your baby into anything but,” and “Don’t Count on DVDs to Improve Your Child’s Vocabulary.” Now, as science catches up to the marketing of these DVDs, more doubts are being raised about their so-called value and effectiveness. Continue reading

Many overweight mothers, children underestimate their actual weight

If parents falsely think that their children are normal weight, when in fact they are overweight or obese, then they are unlikely to do anything to correct the situation. Now there are some data that show parents how bad the situation is. Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes appearing more often in kids

In my book, SuperSized Kids: How to protect your child from the obesity threat, I warn that the childhood obesity epidemic was leading to dramatic increases in the number of kids with diabetes and cardiovascular disease and could shorten their life expectancy. Now we’re beginning to see this come true. Continue reading

Mediterranean diet reduces risk of metabolic syndrome and prediabetes

Researchers have found more proof that the Mediterranean diet is associated with improved blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol. In short, it’s one highly healthy choice for family nutrition. Continue reading

CoQ10 test results show high quality, but wide differences in dosages, formulations, and cost

CoQ10 is among the most popular supplements in the U.S. and is used for cardiovascular disease and a range of other conditions. However, it is easy, however, for a consumer to be confused about CoQ10 due to mixed clinical findings, absorption issues, two chemical forms (CoQ10 and its activated from, ubiquinol), and a variety of suggested dosing across products. Continue reading

Electronic device use prior to bed hindering Americans’ sleep quality

HealthDay reported that “many Americans might be losing valuable shut-eye because they spend the hour before bedtime in front of the electronic glow of a television, cell phone, or computer,” according to the National Sleep Foundation’s annual Sleep in America poll results released earlier this year. Continue reading

CDC Report: Most teens not sexually active, abstinence education works

New data released by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) confirms what will be a surprise to most folks—the majority of teens are NOT sexually active—making it appear that the abstinence education message is getting through to them. Continue reading

Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

I’m surprised how many of my patients are NOT aware of the potential cardiovascular risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or naproxen (Aleve). If you’re in their camp, don’t miss this report: Continue reading

New study reignites debate on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The New York Times notes that after a disease can be “diagnosed reliably through lab tests, creating an accurate case definition” becomes easy. But for illnesses with no known cause and subjective symptoms, such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), competing definitions are “inevitable.” Continue reading

One in three US adults gets less than seven hours’ sleep a night

As I’ve discussed in previous blogs (see list below), most people (whether children, teens, or adults) are simply not getting enough sleep.  And now a couple of studies are providing more stark proof of what we’re doing to ourselves. The Centers for Disease Control is putting new numbers on this problem. Continue reading

Sugary drinks linked to hypertension and obesity

Last week my blog, Diet soda consumption may be linked to increased heart attacks and strokes, was one of my most read postings in some time. Some commented that perhaps they would switch from diet to regular soda. NOT a good idea at all, and here’s another reason why:

Continue reading