The Formula for Good Health = 0, 5, 10, 30, 150

Cancer, Children's Health, General Health, Heart Health, Medical Economics, Men's Health, Nutritional Health, Woman's Health
An easy-to-remember formula for good health (0, 5, 10, 30, 150) is proposed in a wonderful editorial in American Family Physician titled “Preventive Health: Time for Change.” The author suggests this formula to physicians to “help patients achieve healthy lifestyle goals": 0 = no cigarettes or tobacco products 5 = five servings of fruits and vegetables per day 10 = ten minutes of silence, relaxation, prayer, or meditation per day 30 = keep your BMI (body mass index) below 30 150 = number of minutes of exercise per week (e.g., brisk walking or equivalent) The editorial is penned y Colin Kopes-Kerr, MD, from the Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency in Santa Rosa, California: It is time to make a decision. Which will be our health promotion strategy—primary prevention or secondary…
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Three Healthy Habits Cut Breast Cancer Risk, Study Finds

Cancer, Woman's Health
There's been a lot of debate about mammograms for breast cancer screening, but an even more important health promotion exercise would be for women to everything they can to prevent breast cancer. And now experts are reporting that women can do three things to dramatically reduce their risk of getting breast cancer -- especially if they have a strong family history of breast cancer: Exercise (20 minutes of heart-rate raising exercise at least five times a week), Maintain a healthy weight (BMI of 18.5 to under 25), and Watch alcohol intake (fewer than seven drinks per week). Here are the details in a report from HealthDay News: Women who maintain certain "breast-healthy" habits can lower their risk of breast cancer, even if a close relative has had the disease, a…
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Mammography Screening for Breast Cancer: What’s a Woman to Do?

Cancer, Woman's Health
As I've discussed in a previous blog, there has been so much controversy and argument over the last few months about when women should begin mammograms and how often women should have them. The whole thing is very controversial. But, here’s an editorial from experts at American Family Physician that I think does one of the best jobs I’ve seen of clearing up the fog for both physicians and our patients. If you're just interested in the "bottom line," then scroll down the page to find the recommendations for your age group: The November 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation for breast cancer screening,(1) while sparking much controversy, was not a radical departure from their previous 2002 recommendation.(2) The USPSTF approached the recommendation update with the basic questions of…
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