Suggestions for safe trick-or-treating

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Parenting
Before you let your little goblins out of the home for trick-or-treating this year, make sure they're safe and prepared. Here are some good suggestions for safe trick-or-treating and Halloween safety from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Ensure that any accessories that resemble weapons (such as plastic swords) are flexible and short. Make sure costumes fit properly to avoid trips and falls. Instruct children to follow all traffic rules and stay on the sidewalk. Don't let children trick-or-treat without an adult or group of other children. Apply reflective tape to costumes and candy bags so drivers are able to see children. Kids also should carry a flashlight. Inspect children's candy before they eat it to make sure there are no choking or tampering hazards. Put a limit…
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Halloween Extra Scary When Kids Have Nut Allergies

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Parenting
For most kids, Halloween parties and trick-or-treating can be a mixture of fun and frightening, but for children with a nut allergy, the day can actually be dangerous, warns a doctor. Here are the details from HealthDay News: This type of allergy "can be a life-or-death situation. Just because a child only had a rash the first time exposed doesn't mean it won't be more serious the next time," Dr. Sean Cahill, an associate professor of pediatrics at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said in a Loyola news release. "Though having a nut allergy is serious, kids should still be able to have fun. The key is education. Make sure your child knows what he or she can eat," Cahill added. He offered the following suggestions for keeping…
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Halloween Chocolate a Serious Threat to Pets

Marriage and Family Health, Nutritional Health
Chocolate Halloween candy may be a treat for children but poses a serious threat to pets, warns an expert. Here are the details from HealthDay News: Pets who consume chocolate can experience vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and urination, irregular heartbeat, tremors, seizures and even death, said Susan Nelson, a Kansas State University veterinarian. These problems are mainly caused by a substance in chocolate called theobromine. Different types of chocolate have varying concentrations of theobromine. Baking chocolate contains the most, semisweet and milk chocolate sport a medium amount, and white chocolate has the least, Nelson explained in a university news release. If your pet consumes a large quantity of chocolate, you should call a veterinarian or emergency clinic immediately, Nelson said. "Chocolate consumption is a very common problem among pets, dogs…
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