Having a Sister Can Be Good For Your Emotional Health

Marriage and Family Health, Woman's Health
My wife's sister, Sue, is in town this week. Barb and Sue are extremely close and are having a wonderful time together. So, in honor of Barb and Sue, here's a report from USA Today on the health benefits of having a sister: Sisters can fend off ex-boyfriends, mean gossip — and also, apparently, depression. Having a sister protects young teens "from feeling lonely, unloved, guilty, self-conscious and fearful," according to a study released in the Journal of Family Psychology. Researchers from Brigham Young University studied 395 families from Seattle with two or more children. At least one child in each family was between ages 10-14. The research, conducted in 2007 and 2008, found that affectionate siblings have positive influences on each other no matter their age, gender, or how…
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Consumer Reports Finds 12 Supplements with Unsafe Ingredients

Alternative Medicine, Children's Health, Men's Health, Nutritional Health, Woman's Health
ABC World News reported, "Dietary supplements are a $27 billion a year business in this country, but Consumer Reports has an alert" on "supplements the magazine says can be dangerous to your health." Consumer Reports' Nancy Metcalf said, "With the dozen supplements that we've identified, we think it's all risk and no benefit." The CBS Evening News also reported, "Consumer Reports analyzed data from 1,100 supplements and identified 12 that are linked to serious health problems. These include ingredients in weight loss products ... which can cause heart problems and liver damage." Certain other supplements "used for cough ... are associated with liver cancer and even death." CBS noted that the "FDA cannot regulate" the supplements, which are labeled as foods, "until after a product is already on the market." The Los…
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U.S. Dietary Supplements Often Contaminated: Consumer Reports

Alternative Medicine, Children's Health, Men's Health, Nutritional Health, Woman's Health
Many popular dietary supplements contain ingredients that may cause cancer, heart problems, liver or kidney damage, but U.S. stores sell them anyway and Americans spend millions on them, according to a report from the trusted Consumer Reports. Here are the details from Reuters Health: The consumer magazine published a report highlighting the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's lack of power to regulate such supplements, and said the agency rarely uses what little power it does have. The report from the influential group urged Congress to speed up small moves toward giving the agency more clout, especially in regulating supplements. Despite the "natural" labels carried by many of the supplements, many are contaminated. Yet Americans flock to take them, according to the magazine, citing the Nutrition Business Journal as saying the…
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