New Alternative to DEET to Prevent Mosquito Bites

Children's Health, Men's Health, Parenting, Woman's Health
#mce_temp_url#Six insect repellents earn recommendations from Consumer Reports As we head into the final holiday weekend of the summer, many of you may be outdoors this weekend. So, I wanted to share some new information on preventing mosquito bites -- especially for parents desiring an alternative to DEET products. Here are a couple to consider: The experts at the Prescriber's Letter are reporting, "BiteBlocker is a popular natural alternative to DEET for preventing mosquito bites." BiteBlocker, contains 2% soybean oil and "works as well as low concentration DEET." Perhaps even more effective is oil of lemon eucalyptus (Repel Lemon Eucalyptus) as an alternative to DEET. According to Prescriber's Letter, "Products containing 40% lemon eucalyptus seem to work about as well as products containing 20% to 40% DEET." Prescriber's Letter recommends…
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Another Victory for Adult Stem Cells – Vision Restored

Bioethics
ABC World News reported, "This is big medical news. We learned today that doctors have restored sight to some people blinded by accidents" by "harvesting stem cells from their own eyes to grow new corneas." The AP reports, that, according to a study published online June 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine and reported last week at a meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, "dozens of people who were blinded or otherwise suffered severe eye damage when they were splashed with caustic chemicals had their sight restored with transplants of their own stem cells – a stunning success for the burgeoning cell-therapy field." In fact, Italian researchers say that "the treatment worked completely in 82 of 107 eyes and partially in 14 others, with benefits…
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Adult Stem Cells, Not Embryonic, Helping Patients With Multiple Sclerosis

Bioethics
A groundbreaking new study provides more good news for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) with adult stem cells. Researchers at the University of Bristol used patients’ own adult stem cells to treat their MS. In a Phase I clinical trial, six patients with MS were treated with their own bone marrow adult stem cells and their progress followed for one year. The treatment appeared to stabilized the patients’ condition and showed some benefits. As one measure of the success of the procedure, damaged nerve pathways were able to carry electrical pulses more effectively after the treatment. Multiple sclerosis is an incurable disease, with the patient’s own immune system attacking the central nervous system and eventually leaving many patients in a wheelchair. One of the most encouraging aspects of this trial…
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