New plan seeks to put PE back in school – Hallelujah!

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Obesity, Parenting
U.S. schools and childcare programs could be required to include daily exercise as part of the new National Physical Activity Plan released recently. This is, in my opinion, critical to the health of our school children - physically, emotionally, and intellectually. In my book SuperSized Kids: How to protect your child from the obesity threat and on my SuperSized Kids Web site I write at some length about this problem. (You can learn more about my book from the links at the bottom of this blog.) Here are a few of the facts I discuss: Due to the “No Child Left Behind” legislation, schools kids have less Physical Education and daily physical activity programs. Without any question, the No. 1 barrier to physical activity in schools is the perception that time spent…
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Tests of Protein Powders and Drinks Show Some Lead Contamination

Nutritional Health
New tests by one of my favorite natural medicine web sites, ConsumerLab.com, found most protein powders, shakes and drinks to meet their nutrient claims, but two products were contaminated with lead (6 to 18 mcg per day) and a third product contained four extra grams of sugar. The report provides test results for twenty products including those used for body building, meal replacement, sports recovery/endurance, and dieting. "What sets these products apart from other types of supplements and energy foods is protein — typically about 10 to 30 grams per serving," said Tod Cooperman, MD, President of ConsumerLab.com. Adults need about 60 grams of protein per day and more if physically active. “Fortunately, none of the products were found to contain melamine, a cheap and toxic substitute for protein, but…
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Misinformation About Vaccine Safety Puts Kids at Risk of Illness

Children's Health, Parenting
Vaccine Myth #1: Vaccines Cause Autism Misinformation About Vaccine Safety Puts Kids at Risk of IllnessAbout one-third of U.S. parents surveyed had delayed or refused early childhood immunizations. As I've told you in previous blogs, this is a decision that can potentially harm your child and his or her friends. Here's a report from HealthFinder that confirms my beliefs: Physicians report that children who don't receive recommended vaccine doses by the time they're 2 years old are at risk of developing a variety of diseases. But some anti-vaccine activists contend that the shots can cause side effects, including autism, although health officials say repeated studies have failed to uncover such a link. For this study, researchers analyzed the results of a 2008 national survey of parents and health-care providers and…
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Post-Abortion Women Four Times More Likely to Abuse Drugs, Alcohol

Bioethics, Mental Health, Woman's Health
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Manitoba finds women who have had abortions are about four times more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol as those who carried their pregnancy to term. The authors confirmed a link between abortion and the substance abuse issues. This study adds to the risks that we now know occur in women who have previously had an abortion (as opposed to a miscarriage), including mental health issues (especially depression) and, possibly, breast cancer. Before I share the details of this new study, I want to say something very important. If you are one of the many women who has a secret abortion in your past, in no way do I intend to judge or condemn that choice. But, rather, I want…
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More TV for toddlers equals school trouble later

Children's Health, Parenting
Toddlers who watch too much TV may struggle in school later, with measurably lower scores in math, Canadian and U.S. researchers reported recently. Less surprisingly, children who watched more TV at age 2 weighed more by the time they were 10 and ate more snacks and soft drinks, the researchers reported in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. "The results support previous suggestions that early childhood television exposure undermines attention," wrote Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and colleagues at Bowling Green University in Kentucky and the University of Michigan. They said children who spend more time watching TV and less time playing with other kids may lose valuable chances to learn social skills. The researchers started with more than 2,000 children taking part in a larger study.…
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Parents cautioned about giving children dietary supplements

Alternative Medicine, Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Parenting
On the front of its Personal Journal section, the Wall Street Journal reports that increasingly, Americans are giving their children dietary supplements. However, groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Dietetic Association, caution that food is the best source of nutrition. In addition, many supplements, if taken in excess, can prove dangerous. Nevertheless, physicians concede that children who are picky eaters may need certain supplements, although experts urge parents to be wary of nutrition claims, particularly since the FDA does not regulate supplements to the same extent that it does drugs. I have much more information about natural medicines (herbs, vitamins, and supplements), in general, and giving natural medicines to children, in particular, in my best-selling book, Alternative Medicine: the options, the claims, the evidence, how…
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Bullies Target Obese Kids

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Parenting
In my book, SuperSized Kids: How to protect your child from the obesity threat, I discuss the studies showing that if your child is overweight or obese, he or she is significantly more likely to be bullied or to become a bully. Now, a new study has found that being overweight is PRIME factor regardless of race or family income for being bullied. In other words, for kids, a few extra pounds may invite trouble from the schoolyard bully. HealthDay News reports the details: New research suggests that just being overweight increases the risk of being bullied. And factors that usually play a role in the risk of being bullied, such as gender, race, and family income levels, don't seem to matter if you're overweight -- being overweight or obese trumps…
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Read the first five chapters of “The Influenza Bomb” and let me know what you think

Family Newsletter
Here's some good news. You can read the first five chapters of my newest book, "TSI: The Influenza Bomb," for free, by going to the Simon and Schuster website, here, and clicking on the "Browse Inside" tab. After you've read the chapters, come back and leave me a note to let me know what you think! Also, autographed copies of the book (signed by both Paul and myself) will be available here in the next week or so. You can read the first five chapters of my newest book, "TSI: The Influenza Bomb," for free, by going to the website below, and clicking on the "Browse Inside" tab. Let me know what you think!
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Soda consumption may weaken bones

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Parenting
In my book, SuperSized Kids: How to protect your child from the obesity threat, I discuss that sodas not only are associated with obesity, but may well be associated with the weakening of bones due to the heavy load of phosphoric acid in the sodas. The Los Angeles Times reports that researchers are now "trying to figure out how and why, precisely, drinking soda" may weaken bones. In the past, "researchers surmised ... that soda took its toll on bones because children who drank soda did so in place of milk." Investigators are now testing "the theory that phosphoric acid in soda harms bones," based on findings from a 2005 study in the journal Osteoporosis International that indicated "minerals were being removed from bone, and not replaced" in men who "consumed…
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Too much chocolate may be connected to depression

Mental Health, Nutritional Health
The Wall Street Journal reports that, according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, people who consume larger amounts of chocolate may be more depressed than those who eat lesser amounts of it. "Researchers at UC San Diego and UC Davis examined chocolate consumption and other dietary intake patterns among 931 men and women who were not using antidepressants," then screened them for depression, the Los Angeles Times reports. "Those who screened positive for possible depression consumed an average of 8.4 servings of chocolate – defined as one ounce of chocolate candy – per month," compared "with 5.4 servings per month among people who were not depressed." Bloomberg News reports that "the scientists didn't find any evidence of a benefit from chocolate, as it didn't seem to help people overcome…
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Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes. Do you?

Men's Health, Woman's Health
Almost half of American adults, 45% of us, now have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or diabetes, according to a report from researchers from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Los Angeles Times reports that "one in eight Americans has at least two of the conditions and one in 33 has all three, sharply increasing their risk." These "data come from the ongoing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." While "researchers should be able to use the new data to plan interventions, 'the main thing here is for people to be aware that they have these conditions and know that lifestyle modifications and medications can control them and reduce their risk for cardiovascular disease,' said epidemiologist Cheryl D. Fryar of the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics, one of…
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Larimore Family Newsletter – June 2010

Family Newsletter
Here are the contents of our Family Newsletter for June: Family Update - Traveling to Italy Publication Update TSI: The Influenza Bomb is out. Order autographed copies. Book Signing in Colorado Springs Dr. Walt Interviewed on Childhood Obesity Dr. Walt Featured on iMOM Dr. Walt published in Significant Living Magazine Workplace Grace released last month Events of the last month Upcoming Events Family Update Barb and I are back from our three-week trip-of-a-lifetime to Italy. If’ you’d like to experience Italy vicariously, and follow along for our adventure and view of Barb’s amazing photos, you can do so by starting here and then following the links at the bottom of each blog. Publishing Update TSI: The Influenza Bomb is out. Get your autographed copies here. My second novel, co-written with my…
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