Nuts may help lower cholesterol levels

Heart Health, Nutritional Health
According to a report in the Wall Street Journal research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine suggests that nuts may help lower cholesterol levels. HealthDay reported that investigators "pooled data on 583 men and women who had participated in 25 nut consumption trials." "Patients in the trials ate an average of 67 grams, or about 2.4 ounces, of nuts daily," WebMD reported. While MedPage Today reported that the researchers found that "eating an average of 67 grams of nuts a day (2.4 ounces) reduced total cholesterol by 5.9% and LDL cholesterol by 7.4%." The bottom line, a couple of ounces of nuts per day may be heart healthy and highly healthy.
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Take Vitamin D With Largest Meal

Nutritional Health
Taking your vitamin D supplement with the largest meal of the day may boost its absorption substantially, according to a new study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic. Here are details from WebMD: The researchers  instructed 17 men and women, average age 64, whose blood levels of vitamin D were borderline insufficient despite taking supplements, to take their supplements with the largest meal of the day. After two or three months, the study participants had about a 50% increase in blood levels of the vitamin, regardless of the dose they took. Researchers Guy B. Mulligan, MD, and Angelo Licata, MD, had noticed that patients typically report taking the supplement either on an empty stomach or with a light meal. Because the vitamin is fat-soluble, the researchers speculated that taking it…
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Is OJ as good a source of vitamin D as supplements?

Nutritional Health
A glass of orange juice may not only help the vitamin pill go down. A new study suggests that fortified varieties can also help the body's vitamin D levels go up - just as effectively as the supplement itself. The finding could bring a welcome addition to a very short list of sources for vitamin D, which is thought to help fend off an array of health problems including brittle bones, diabetes, and cancer. Here are details from Reuters Health: "A lot of people don't drink milk," which has been fortified with vitamin D since the 1930s, "but they do drink OJ in the morning," the study's study author, Dr. Michael Holick, of the Boston University School of Medicine, told Reuters Health. Simply adding a vitamin to a food does not guarantee its…
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