Should Cholesterol Drugs Be Used By Those Without High Cholesterol?

Health Headlines
Some experts say statins help healthier people, but others worry about risks. So, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of the cholesterol-lowering statin drug Crestor for some people with normal cholesterol levels, cardiologist Dr. Steven E. Nissen cheered the decision. But, not everyone did. Here are the details in a report from HealthDay News: "You have to go with the scientific evidence," said Nissen, who is chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. "A clinical trial was done and there was a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality in people treated with this drug." But Dr. Mark A. Hlatky, a professor of health research and policy and medicine at Stanford University, has expressed doubts about the FDA move. He worries that more people will…
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Online Brazilian Diet Pills Can Be Addictive

Alternative Medicine, Nutritional Health, Obesity
Researcher have found a dangerous mix of amphetamines, tranquilizers and antidepressants found in some pills. Although marketed on the Internet as "natural," the popular weight loss supplements known as Brazilian diet pills contain potentially addictive ingredients. Here are the details in a report from HealthFinder: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned consumers in 2006 of dangers associated with the diet pills, but they remain popular and easy to order online, the researchers say. "What we have seen and what the FDA has found is that, unfortunately, there are dozens of products that are sold as dietary supplements that are contaminated with pharmaceutical compounds," said lead researcher Dr. Pieter Cohen, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. People already prone to addiction can become dependent on these nonprescription drugs, and…
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Expectant Mom’s Exercise Keeps Newborn’s Birth Weight Down

Children's Health, Nutritional Health, Obesity, Parenting, Woman's Health
A pregnant mother's exercise may lower her baby's risk of obesity later in life. The new research shows that regular moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy reduces an infant's birth weight, which may lower the child's risk of obesity later in life. In a new study, 84 first-time pregnant women were randomly assigned to exercise or control groups, with those in the exercise group participating in a weekly maximum of five 40-minute sessions on a stationary cycle. They did this program until at least 36 weeks into their pregnancy. Here are the details from HealthDay News: Babies born to mothers in the exercise group were an average of 143 grams lighter than infants born to mothers in the control group, and also had a lower body-mass index (a measurement that takes into account…
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