“Fat dissolving” spa treatments do no such thing

Men's Health, Obesity, Woman's Health
So-called "fat dissolving treatments" offered by spas do NOT eliminate fat and the companies should stop saying so -- at least according to a press release from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA says the procedures are called by names such as lipodissolve, mesotherapy, lipozap, lipotherapy, or injection lipolysis -- and all involve unproven injections. The AP reports that "the Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on what are billed as fat-melting injections used in spas across the US, saying the drugs" have not "been cleared by federal scientists, as required by law." "We are concerned that these companies are misleading consumers," Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a statement. "It is important for anyone who is considering this voluntary…
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Forgotten Study: Child Abuse in Schools 100 Times Worse than by Priests

Children's Health, Parenting
I appreciated a report from LifeSiteNews.com reminding me of a study that had fallen off my radar. No doubt, you're aware that in the last several weeks an incredible quantity of ink has been spilled in newspapers across the globe about the priestly sex abuse scandals in Catholic institutions in several countries. Certain a casual reader might think that Catholic priests are the worst and most common perpetrators of child sex abuse. Such is NOT the case. Here are the details, from LifeSiteNews: But according to Charol Shakeshaft, the researcher of a little-remembered 2004 study prepared for the U.S. Department of Education, "the physical sexual abuse of students in schools is likely more than 100 times the abuse by priests." After effectively disappearing from the radar, Shakeshaft’s study is now…
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Teen Birth Rates Fall After Two Year Increase, Abstinence Education Credited

Children's Health, Parenting
Poll Shows Majority of Americans Say Abstinence Effective, Want Parents Involved Multiple news reports are trumpeting the fact that teen birth rates fell in 2008 after increasing during the two years prior, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control. Immediately after the reports surfaced, backers of abstinence education have credited their programs as making an impact. The CDC's National Center for Health Statistics reported today that the full birth rate fell two percent in 2008. Some 4,251,095 babies were born in the United States in 2008, down two percent from the 4.317 million the year before. The birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 fell by 2 percent as well and the CDC says the decline resumes the long-term trend of falling teen birth rates since 1991 -- during…
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