Tips on Babyproofing Your Home

Children's Health, Parenting
Accidents and injuries can happen all over the house, but a few babyproofing measures can help keep your young child safe, according to a report from the American Academy of Family Physicians. These tips, from a HealthDay News report, can help you prevent accidents in your home: Make sure there are no cords in baby's bedroom that could become wrapped around the neck. In the kitchen, make sure your child can't reach hot drinks, foods or pots and pans on the stove. Also, keep sharp objects and appliance cords out of your child's reach. Keep all medicines, cleaning solutions and other potentially dangerous substances locked away and out of a child's reach. Make sure your water heater is set at no higher than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to prevent burns. Make sure…
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Kids outgrow growing pains

Children's Health, Parenting
Most youngsters grow out of having otherwise unexplained bone and muscle aches known as growing pains, researchers from Israel report in a new study. Of 35 children who originally had growing pains, Dr. Yosef Uziel, at Meir Medical Center in Kfar-Saba, and co-investigators found that 18 (51 percent) no longer had growing pains 5 years later, when they were about 13 years old. Fourteen of the 17 who still had growing pains after 5 years said their episodes had decreased and become milder, the researchers report in The Journal of Pediatrics. Reuters Health reports these details: These findings, and the fact that growing pains did not result in school absences or sleep problems, hint at "the benign nature of this common syndrome," Uziel commented in an email to Reuters Health. Nonetheless,…
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Babies should take vitamin D supplement

Children's Health, Parenting
Frequent readers to this blog are aware of the growing incidence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in all age groups in the US. Now, according to a new study published online in the journal Pediatrics, "most babies should take a daily vitamin D supplement." USA Today reports that the researchers say, "only 1% to 13% of infants under one year now get a vitamin D supplement, available in inexpensive drops." The study said "those drops are needed ... because only 5% to 37% of American infants met the standard for vitamin D set by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2008: 400 international units (IU) a day. This matches what I am recommending for my pediatric patients (from infancy, through childhood, and into adolescence): give a supplement of 400…
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