Though unproven, 1 in 4 parents believes vaccines cause autism

Children's Health, Parenting
The New York Times, in Vital Signs, reports that one in four parents "think some vaccines cause autism in healthy children, and nearly one in eight have refused at least one recommended vaccine," according to a study published online March 1 in the journal Pediatrics. The USA covered the story with this article: Most parents continue to follow the advice of their children's doctors, according to a study based on a survey of 1,552 parents. Extensive research has found no connection between autism and vaccines. "Nine out of 10 parents believe that vaccination is a good way to prevent diseases for their children," said lead author Dr. Gary Freed of the University of Michigan. "Luckily their concerns don't outweigh their decision to get vaccines so their children can be protected…
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Survey Shows Parents Still Worry Unnecessarily About Vaccines

Children's Health, Parenting
Most parents believe vaccination is a good way to protect their children from potentially deadly diseases, but a study shows more than half still worry about the possibility of vaccine side effects. The study concludes: Although parents overwhelmingly share the belief that vaccines are a good way to protect their children from disease, these same parents express concerns regarding the potential adverse effects and especially seem to question the safety of newer vaccines. Although information is available to address many vaccine safety concerns, such information is not reaching many parents in an effective or convincing manner. Here's an article on the survey from WebMD: The study shows 88% of parents follow the child immunization schedule recommended by their doctor, but 54% are concerned about serious vaccine side effects. Researcher Gary…
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Parents Often Miss Subtle Autism Signs

Children's Health, Parenting
Action Points Explain to interested parents that autism may progress more slowly and subtly than previously thought. Note that parents often miss regressive symptoms of autism in their children. The symptoms of autism tend to emerge in children after six months of age, with a loss of social and communications skills that is more common and more subtle than previously thought, according to a new study that questions previous assumptions about the progression of the condition. At six months, children with autism spectrum disorder demonstrated behavior similar to other children, gazing at faces, sharing smiles, and vocalizing with similar frequency, researchers reported online in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. However, autistic children displayed fewer of these behaviors as as they got older, and from…
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