U.S. News unveils ranking of health insurance plans (including Medicare)

U.S. News & World Report recently released its ranking of the top health insurance plans in the U.S. If you desire to be your own healthcare quarterback, as I recommend in my book, God’s Design for the Highly Healthy Person, this information will help you evaluate your current health insurance plan, be it commercial, Medicare, or Medicaid.

More Information:

U.S. News & World Report split its review into:

 

 

In an introductory article, U.S. News & World Report reports, “For years, workers have watched their healthcare outlays rise and benefits shrink, and for some, whether they will have benefits at all suddenly is in doubt.”

And as the economy weakens and more companies begin trimming staff, “your healthcare, along with your job and your 401(k), could suffer as well.

Many employees may worry they’re only a couple of bad balance sheets away from joining the ranks of the nearly 46 million Americans without health insurance. Unfortunately, they may be right.

“For those that do find themselves unemployed,” U.S. News notes that “taking advantage of COBRA can be costly.”

However, “healthcare insurance providers themselves are unlikely to go under. State regulators keep close tabs on these companies.” So for those that can find coverage, “that’s one less thing to worry about.”

In their ranking of health plans, U.S. News & World Report points out in another article that some plans did not turn over the data necessary for the magazine to rank them.

“To appear in the annual U.S. News Best Health Plans rankings, managed-care providers have to turn over data describing their performance in a host of clinical and member-satisfaction measures to our rankings partner, the National Committee for Quality Assurance. They also must agree to make the information public.”

U.S. News offers a table of some of the larger plans that did not offer data.

U.S. News & World Report  also offers advice on how to pick a health insurance plan.

Of the ten tips, U.S. News advises readers to weigh flexibility and check the provider network of potential plans. Consumers can also “cut expenses with a tax-deductible FSA” and “check out wellness management incentives,” which may lead to cost savings. 

 

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